Audubon Swamp Garden at Magnolia Plantation

The Audubon Swamp was once a freshwater reservoir used for rice cultivation. Now it’s a black water cypress and tupedo swamp. It’s 60 acres covered by boardwalks and trails filled with local wildlife. If it’s a lucky day you can see egrets, herons, bald eagles, alligators, otters, and turtles. While walking around keep in mind these were all rice fields worked on by slaves.

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You can see the water levels by the differences in color on the vegetation.

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The water gets its black hue from Cypress tree tannins. It’s clean just looks dirty from the coloring. The reflections from the dark colored water are very nice.

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5 thoughts on “Audubon Swamp Garden at Magnolia Plantation

  1. So the water in the marsh isn’t very deep? I’m guessing so by looking at the photo of the egret standing in the water. It’s not hard to imagine those were once rice paddies, but I can’t imagine working in summer heat and humidity with the bugs out there.

    Beautiful pictures! I enjoy watching wildlife, but not sure about that alligator there. 😉

    1. I can’t picture them as rice fields! I can’t imagine how grueling that kind of work is. Didn’t think to ask about the depth. Wouldn’t w
      ant to be caught in the water. I bet there’s tons of wildlife if it was summer.

  2. Thanks for sharing, these are awesome photography’s. On Feb 15, 2016 9:01 PM, “Jebus Mews & Andrea” wrote:

    > jebusandandrea posted: “The Audubon Swamp was once a freshwater reservoir > used for rice cultivation. Now it’s a black water cypress and tupedo swamp. > It’s 60 acres covered by boardwalks and trails filled with local wildlife. > If it’s a lucky day you can see egrets, herons, bald e” >

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