Temple Emanu-El of New York

Temple Emanu-El is located at One East 65th Street, across the street from Central Park. It is one of the largest Reform synagogues in the world. On April 1845, Emanu-El was founded by German Jews on the Lower East Side in a rented hall around Grand and Clinton Streets. At the time, Germany wasn’t unified (federated), they consisted of a German confederation of states. This is the oldest Reform congregation in New York. Continue reading


Eldridge Street Synagogue and Museum at Eldridge Street

The Eldridge Street Synagogue was built in 1887 and is located on the Lower East Side. This landmarked beauty was a synagogue from the very beginning unlike others that were converted from churches. The building was designed by architects Francis and Peter Herter in Moorish Revival style. Continue reading

Mikvé Israel-Emanuel Synagogue in Willemstad, Curaçao

Mikvé Israel-Emanuel Synagogue in Willemstad, Curacao is the oldest surviving synagogue in use in the New World. Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands and her family visited in 1992.  Continue reading

St. John the Divine

St. John the Divine is the oldest building in Morningside Heights and one of the largest churches in the world. The cathedral was never completed. They have the largest rose window in the United States. Originally, the cathedral was supposed to be designed in a Byzantine – Romanesque Revival style but was changed in 1909 to Gothic Revival. It was designed in 1888 and work began in 1892, it’s design has gone through a lot of changes and construction was interrupted in WWI & WWII. They are often referred to as St John the Unfinished due to its ongoing construction work and renovations. Continue reading

Notre Dame Basilica

Notre Dame Basilica is located in Old Montreal. The basilica had a few incarnations. The version we see today was designed by New York based architect James O’Donnell, an Irish Protestant. The first stone was laid on September 1, 1824. When construction was finished, Notre Dame was the largest church in North America for over 50 years.  Continue reading

Bialystoker Synagogue & Congregation Beth Hachasidim De Polen

Bialystoker Synagogue is at 7-11 Bialystoker Place which use to be known as Willet Street. The building was constructed in 1826 and was the Willet Street Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1905, the synagogue bought the church. Continue reading